Canaanhund
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Canaanhund


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Canaanhund:
FCI:
Anerkjent av FCI
FCI nummer: 273
Gruppe 5: Spisshunder
Seksjon 6: Primitive raser
 
AKC:
Anerkjent av AKC
Herding
The Herding Group, created in 1983, is the newest AKC classification; its members were formerly members of the Working Group. All breeds share the fabulous ability to control the movement of other animals. A remarkable example is the low-set Corgi, perhaps one foot tall at the shoulders, that can drive a herd of cows many times its size to pasture by leaping and nipping at their heels. The vast majority of Herding dogs, as household pets, never cross paths with a farm animal. Nevertheless, pure instinct prompts many of these dogs to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family. In general, these intelligent dogs make excellent companions and respond beautifully to training exercises.
ANDRE NAVN: Israelsk pariahhund, Canaan dog
 
STØRRELSE: Medium
VEKT: Hann: 20-25kg
Tispe: 18-23kg
HØYDE: Hann: 55-60cm
Tispe: 50-55cm
FARGE(R): Lys gulbrun/rødbrun/sort/sort&brun
PELSLENGDE: Kort/semi kort
PELS: Slette harde dekkhår
PELSSTELL: Lite
ALLERGI: Ja
AKTIVITET: Aktiv
 

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Canaanhund
Pariahunder
[...pariahunder (av tamilsk paraiyar, som betyr omstreifende og egentlig refererer til en tamilsk folkegruppe av kasteløs rang, nå mer kalt daliter) refer...]
Spisshunder
[...spisshund (også kalt spets og spitz) er betegnelsen på en gruppe hunder som deler en rekke morfologiske- og anatomiske fellestrekk. det mest i øyenfal...]
 

Caanan Dog
Om Caanan Dog:

Inquisitive, loyal and loving with his family, the Caanan Dog is a breed that moves with athletic agility. Today, he is successful in the herding, obedience, agility and conformation arenas. This breed has two color patterns: either predominantly white with a mask, with or without additional patches of color, or solid colored with or without white trim.

A Look Back
The Canaan Dog, the natural breed of Israel, dates back to Biblical times, originating in the Land of Canaan. The Canaan Dog was the guard and herd dog of the ancient Israelites, guarding their camps and flocks. In anticipation of Israel's War of Independence and WWII, Dr. Rudolphina Menzel recruited and trained more than 400 of the best dogs as mine detectors for the Middle East forces, and they proved superior to the mechanical detectors.

On September 7, 1965, Ursula Berkowitz of Oxnard, California, imported the first four Canaan Dogs with the idea of establishing the breed in the United States.

Right Breed for You?
While the Caanan Dog is highly territorial, the breed is docile with his family, yet reserved and aloof with strangers. He may be very vocal at times. This breed will need regular exercise, but is easily trained. His short coat requires minimal maintenance.

  • Herding Group; AKC recognized in 1997.
  • Ranging in size from 19 to 24 inches tall at the shoulder and 35 to 55 pounds.
  • Sheep herder.

Rasebeskrivelse:

General Appearance
The Canaan Dog is a herding and flock guardian dog native to the Middle East. He is aloof with strangers, inquisitive, loyal and loving with his family. His medium-size, square body is without extremes, showing a clear, sharp outline. The Canaan Dog moves with athletic agility and grace in a quick, brisk, ground-covering trot. He has a wedge-shaped head with low-set erect ears, a bushy tail that curls over the back when excited, and a straight, harsh, flat-lying double coat.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Size--Height at the withers is 20 to 24 inches for dogs and 19 to 23 inches for bitches. The ideal Canaan Dog lies in the middle of the stated ranges. Disqualifications--Dogs less than 20 inches or more than 25 inches. Bitches less than 18 inches or more than 23 inches. Proportion--Square when measured from the point of the withers to the base of the tail and from the point of the withers to the ground. Substance--Moderate. Dogs generally weigh 45 to 55 pounds and bitches approximately 35 to 45 pounds. Dogs distinctly masculine without coarseness and bitches feminine without over-refinement.

Head
Elongated, the length exceeding the breadth and depth considerably. Wedge-shaped, when viewed from above. Slightly arched when viewed from the side, tapering to stop. The region of the forehead is of medium width, but appearing broader through ears set low to complete an alert expression, with a slight furrow between the eyes. Expression--Alert, watchful and inquisitive. Dignified. Eyes--Dark, almond-shaped, slightly slanted. Varying shades of hazel with liver-pointed dogs. Eye rims darkly pigmented or of varying shades of liver harmonizing with coat color. Fault--Unpigmented eye rims. Ears--Erect, medium to large, set moderately low, broad at the base, tapering to a very slightly rounded tip. Ears angled very slightly forward when excited. A straight line from the inner corner of the ear to the tip of the nose should just touch the inner corner of the eye and a line drawn from the tip of the ear to the tip of the nose should just touch the outer corner of the eye. Ear motion contributes to expression and clearly defines the mood of the dog. Major Fault--In the adult dog, other than erect ears. Stop--Slightly accentuated. Muzzle--Tapering to complete the wedge shape of the head. Length equal to or slightly longer than the length of the skull from the occiput to stop. Whisker trimming optional. Nose--Darkly pigmented or varying shades of liver, harmonizing with coat color. Lips--Tight with good pigmentation. Bite--Scissors.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck--well arched. Balance to body and head and free from throatiness. Topline--Level with slight arch over the loins. Body--Strong, displaying athletic agility and trimness. Chest--Moderately broad and deep, extending to the elbows, with well-sprung ribs. Loin--Well-tucked up. Short, muscled flanks. Tail--Set moderately high. May be carried curled over the back when excited; limited to one full curl. When extended, the bone must reach to the hocks. Fault: Tail which falls over to either side of the back.

Forequarters
Shoulders moderately angulated. Legs straight. Pasterns flexible with very slight slope when viewed from the side. Dewclaws may be removed. Feet--Catlike, pads hard, pigmentation harmonizing with nose and eye rims. Nails strong, hard, pigmentation harmonizing with either nose and eye rims or coat.

Hindquarters
Moderately angulated. In balance with forequarters. Straight when viewed from the rear. Thigh musculature well-developed, moderately broad. Hocks well-let-down. Dewclaws must be removed. Feet and nails as in fore-quarters.

Coat
Double coat. Outer coat-straight, harsh, flat-lying, with slight ruff. Ruff more pronounced on males. Length of outer coat ½ to 1½ inch; longer on ruff and back of thighs, shorter on body, legs and head. Undercoat--straight, soft, short, flat-lying, density varying with climate. Tail bushy, increasing in plumage from set to end of bones, then tapering to pointed tip. Faults--Excessively long guard coat that masks the clean outline of the dog. Any trimming that alters the natural appearance of the dog.

Color
There are two color patterns. Pattern 1) Predominantly white with mask and with or without additional patches of color (large body patches are desirable). Pattern 2) Solid colored with or without white trim. Color may range from black through all shades of brown - sandy to red or liver. Shadings of black on a solid brown or tan dog are frequently seen. The trim on a solid colored dog may include chest, undercarriage, feet and lower part of leg and tip of tail. In all color patterns self-ticking may be present. Disqualifications--a) Gray and/or brindle. b) All white.

Mask
The mask is a desired and distinguishing feature of the predominantly white Canaan Dog. The mask is the same color(s) as the body patches on the dog. The basically symmetrical mask must completely cover the eyes and ears or can completely cover the head as in a hood. The only allowed white in the mask or hood is a white blaze of any size or shape and/or white on the muzzle below the mask. Faults--On predominantly white dogs--absence of mask, half mask, or grossly asymmetrical mask.

Gait
Movement is very important. Good reach and drive. Quick, brisk natural trot, apparently tireless, indicating an animal capable of trotting for hours. Covers ground more quickly than expected. Agile, able to change directions almost instantaneously. Tends to single-track at high speed. Fault--Anything that detracts from efficient movement.

Temperament
Alert, vigilant, devoted and docile with his family. Reserved and aloof with strangers. Highly territorial, serving as a responsive companion and natural guardian. Very vocal, persistent. Easily trained. Faults--Shyness or dominance toward people.

Disqualifications
Dogs less than 20 inches or more than 25 inches.
Bitches less than 18 inches or more than 23 inches.
Gray and/or brindle.
All white.



Historikk:

The Canaan Dog, the natural breed of Israel, dates back to Biblical times, originatingin the Land of Canaan. Drawings found on the tombs at Beni-Hassan, dating from 2200 to 2000 B.C., depict dogs that show an unmistakable resemblance to the Canaan Dog of today.

The Canaan Dog waas the guard and herd dog of the ancient Israelites, guarding their camps and flocks. They were plentiful in the region until the dispersion of the Israelites by the Romans more than 2,000 years ago. As the Hebrew population dropped, the majority of the dogs sought refuge in the Negev Desert, a natural reservoir of Israeli wildlife. Avoiding extinction, they remained undomesticated for the most part, although some lived with the Bedouins and earned their keep by guarding the herds and camps. Some were also guards for the Druze on Mount Carmel.

This was how the Canaan Dog survived until the arrival of Dr. Rudolphina Menzel, who was asked by the Haganah (a Jewish self-defense organization) to develop a dog to guard the isolated Jewish settlements and supervise the build-up of war dogs for Israel's coming War of Independence. Remembering the Canaan Dog living in the desert, she knew only the fittest would have survived such hardships. As a breed the Canaan Dog proved highly intelligent and easily trainable, serving as sentry dogs, messengers, Red Cross helpers, and land mine locators. During World War II, Dr. Menzel recruited and trained more than 400 of the best dogs as mine detectors for the Middle East forces, and they proved superior to the mechanical detectors.

After the war, Dr. Menzel dedicated her time to helping the blind and in 1949 founded The Institute for Orientation and Mobility of the Blind, the only one of its kind in the Middle East. The entire Canaan Dog breeding program was concentrated within the Institute, where a solid foundation of kennel-raised Canaan Dogs was established that carried the name B'Nei Habitachon. The breed was first recognized by the Palestine Kennel Club, the forerunner of the Israel Kennel Club. By 1948, there were about 150 Canaan Dogs registered in their stud book.

On September 7, 1965, Ursula Berkowitz of Oxnard, California, imported the first four Canaan Dogs with the idea of establishing the breed in the United States. The Canaan Dog Club of America was formed the same year, and stud book records were kept from these first reports.

The Canaan Dog entered the Miscellaneous Class in June 1989, and dogs were registered in the AKC Stud Book as of June 1, 1997. The dogs began competing in conformation on August 12, 1997.



Farger og egenheter:

Colors
 
Description Type Code
 
Black S 007
Cream S 076
Golden S 093
Liver S 123
Red S 140
Tan S 195
White S 199
 
Markings
 
Description Type Code
 
Black Markings S 002
Cream Markings S 044
Gold Markings S 097
Liver Markings S 010
Red Markings S 023
Tan Markings S 012
White Trim S 101
 
 


Visste du?

  • The Canaan Dog is AKC's 141st breed.
  • The Canaan Dog is the natural breed of Israel.
  • The Canaan Dog dates back to Biblical times, originating in the Land of Canaan.
  • Drawings on the tombs at Beni-Hassan, dating from 2200-2000 BC, depict dogs that remarkably resemble the Canaan Dogs of today.
  • After the Israelites were dispersed by the Romans more than 2000 years ago, the majority of Canaan Dogs avoided extinction in the natural reservoir of Israeli wildlife, the Negev Desert. Some lived with the Bedouins, and some were also guards for the Druze on Mt. Carmel.
  • Dr. Rudolphina Menzel, who was asked by the Haganah (a Jewish self-defense organization) to develop a guard dog for the isolated Jewish settlements and supervise the aggrandizement of war dogs for Israel's approaching War of Independence, sought out the Canaan Dog. The breed proved highly intelligent and trainable and served as sentry dogs, messengers, Red Cross helpers, and land mine locators. In fact, during World War II, Menzel's dogs proved superior to the mechanical detectors.
  • The Canaan Dog began competing in conformation in 1997 after a brief stay in the Miscellaneous class during the '90s.