Bluetick Coonhund
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Bluetick Coonhund


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Bluetick Coonhund:
FCI: Ikke anerkjent av FCI
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AKC:
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Hound
Most hounds share the common ancestral trait of being used for hunting. Some use acute scenting powers to follow a trail. Others demonstrate a phenomenal gift of stamina as they relentlessly run down quarry. Beyond this, however, generalizations about hounds are hard to come by, since the Group encompasses quite a diverse lot. There are Pharaoh Hounds, Norwegian Elkhounds, Afghans and Beagles, among others. Some hounds share the distinct ability to produce a unique sound known as baying. You'd best sample this sound before you decide to get a hound of your own to be sure it's your cup of tea.
ANDRE NAVN: Bluetick Coonhound
 
STØRRELSE: Stor
VEKT: Hann: 20-36kg
Tispe: 18-34kg
HØYDE: Hann: 53-69cm
Tispe: 51-67cm
FARGE(R): Tricolor. Flekkete blåskimmer/-flekkete
PELSLENGDE: Kort
PELS: Glatt og blank. Kort og tett. Kjennes ru å ta på.
PELSSTELL: Endel
ALLERGI: Ja
AKTIVITET: Endel
 

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Bluetick Coonhund
 

Bluetick Coonhound
Om Bluetick Coonhound:

Like many coonhounds, the Bluetick Coonhound gets its name from a coat pattern, which is dark blue in color and covered in a ticking or mottled pattern. Working ability is very important to owners who prize the sturdy and athletic Bluetick for its skill in trailing and treeing raccoons and other small animals. Blueticks are known for having the typical coonhound "bawling" bark. This steady and determined breed can stay on the most intricate of tracks, making it a prized companion for active sporting families.

A Look Back

The Bluetick Coonhound’s color suggests that it descended from the Grand Bleu de Gascogne (French Staghound) as well as the English Foxhound. In America, Blueticks were referred to as English Coonhounds for many years. In 1945, however, Bluetick breeders broke away from the English breeders because they didn't want to follow the trend toward producing a hot-nosed, faster hunter. Proud of their larger, cold-nosed and resolute, if slower hounds, they re-named their breed and maintained their own hunting style.

Right Breed for You?
Athletic and hardy, Blueticks are working dogs that need a job – such as hunting, obedience or agility – to stay happy. Their short, glossy coat requires only occasional baths and brushing.

  • Hound Group; AKC recognized in 2009.
  • Ranging in size from 21 to 27 inches tall at the shoulder and 45 to 80 pounds.
  • Raccoon hunter; small game hunter.

Rasebeskrivelse:

General Appearance
The Bluetick should have the appearance of a speedy and well-muscled hound. He never appears clumsy or overly chunky in build. He has a neat, compact body, a glossy coat and clear, keen eyes. In motion he carriers his head and tail well up.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Height at withers for adult males, 22 to 27 inches. For adult females, 21 to 25 inches. Weight for males 55 to 80 pounds, females 45 to 65 pounds. Proportion (measured from point of shoulder to base of tail and withers to ground) is square or slightly longer than tall. DISQUALIFICATIONS: Males under 22 inches or over 27 inches. Females under 21 inches or over 25 inches. (Entries in puppy class are not to be disqualified for being undersize.)

Head
The head is broad between the ears with a slightly domed skull. Total length of head from occiput to end of nose is 9 to 10 inches in males and 8 to 9 inches in females. Stop is prominent. Muzzle is long, broad and deep, square in profile with flews that well cover the line of the lower jaw. Depth of foreface should be 3 to 4½ inches.

Eyes – rather large, set wide apart in skull. Round in shape and dark brown in color (never lighter than light brown). Eye rims tight and close fitting. No excess third eyelid should be apparent. Expression is a typical pleading hound expression, never wild or cowering.

Ears – set low and devoid of erectile power. Should be thin with a slight roll, taper well towards a point, and reach well towards the end of the nose when pulled forward. Well attached to head to prevent hanging or backward tilt.

Nose – large with well-opened nostrils. Fully pigmented, black in color.

Teeth – scissors bite preferred, even bite acceptable. Undershot or overshot are disqualifying faults. Disqualifications: undershot or overshot.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck – muscular and of moderate length, tapering slightly from shoulders to head. Carried well up but not vertical (goose necked). Throat clean with only a slight trace of dewlap.

Body – the body should show considerable depth (extending well down toward the elbow), rather than excessive width, to allow for plenty of lung space. Forechest is moderate, fairly even with the point of the shoulder. Girth of chest for males is 26 to 34 inches, for females 23 to 30 inches. Ribs are long and well-sprung, tapering gradually towards a moderate tuck-up. Back is muscular and topline slopes downward slightly from withers to hips. Loin is broad, well-muscled and slightly arched.

Forequarters
Legs are straight from elbows to feet, well boned and muscular, with strong, straight, slightly sloping pasterns. Legs should appear straight from either side or front view. Length of leg from elbow to ground is approximately one half the height at the withers. Shoulders are clean and sloping, muscular but not too broad or rough, giving the appearance of freedom of movement and strength.

Hindquarters
Hips are strong and well muscled, not quite as wide as ribcage. Thighs have great muscular development for an abundance of propelling power. Breeching full and clean down to hock. Hocks are strong and moderately bent. Dewclaws are removed. Rear legs are parallel from hip to foot when viewed from behind (no cowhocks).

Feet
Round (cat-like) with well arched toes and thick, tough pads.

Tail
Set on slightly below the line of the back, strongly rooted and tapering to a moderate length (in balance to the overall length of the hound). Carried high with a forward half-moon curve. Well coated but without flag.

Coat
Medium coarse and lying close to the body, appearing smooth and glossy. Not rough or too short.

Color
Preferred color is a dark blue, thickly mottled body, spotted by various shaped black spots on back, ears and sides. Preference is to more blue than black on body. Head and ears predominately black. With or without tan markings (over eyes, on cheeks, chest and below tail) and red ticking on feet and lower legs. A fully blue mottled body is preferred over light ticking on the body. There should be more blue ticking than white in the body coat. No other colors allowed. Disqualifications: Any color other than that described in the standard. Albinism.

Gait
Active and vigorous, with topline carried firmly and head and tail well up.

Characteristics
Active, ambitious and speedy on the trail. The Bluetick should be a free tonguer on trail, with a medium bawl or bugle voice when striking and trailing, which may change to a steady chop when running and a steady coarse chop at the tree.

Disqualifications
Males under 22 inches or over 27 inches.
Females under 21 inches or over 25 inches.
(Entries in puppy class are not to be disqualified for being undersize.)
Any color other than that described in the standard.
Undershot or overshot.
Albinism.

Approved – November 2007
Effective – July 1, 2008



Historikk:

The modern Bluetick's color indicates that it descended from the Grand Bleu de Gascogne (French Staghound) as well as the English Foxhound. Many French hounds were brought to America and contributed to the coonhound breeds. One owned by George Washington was recorded as giving birth to 15 puppies, and Washington likened their musical voices to the "bells of Moscow." The Grand Bleu was too slow on the trail to please the American hunter, but when bred to American hounds, it increased their coldtrailing ability and their endurance.

Although Blueticks were originally classified as English Coonhounds, Bluetick breeders broke away from the English breeders in 1945 because they didn't want to follow the trend toward producing a hot-nosed, faster hunter. Proud of their larger, cold-nosed and resolute, if slower hounds, they named their breed and maintained their own hunting style. For a short time, puppies with blue ticking were classified as Blueticks and those with red ticking were still called English. But that practice soon ceased as each Coonhound maintained its own group of staunch supporters.

An intelligent, cold-nosed hunter that trees hard and long, the Bluetick has the ability and endurance to stay on the most intricate track. He is a free tonguer on the trail with a medium bawl or bugle voice when striking and trailing. This changes to a steady chop when running and a steady course chop at tree.



Farger og egenheter:

Colors
 
Description Type Code
 
Blue Ticked S 379
Blue Ticked and Tan S 527
 
Markings
 
Description Type Code
 
Black Spots S 080
 
 


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  • The Bluetick Coonhound is AKC's 162nd breed.
  • At the April 2009 Boarding the Bluetick Coonhound became eligible for AKC registration, December 30, 2009 and was eligible for competition in the Hound Group, effective January 1, 2010. There will be an open registry for the breed until January 1, 2015.
  • At the November 2007 Board Meeting the Bluetick Coonhound was approved to compete in the Miscellaneous Class this became effective July 1, 2008.
  • In December 2003 the AKC Board approved the eligibility of some Foundation Stock breeds, which meet certain criteria, for competition in AKC Companion Events (Obedience, Tracking, and Agility), effective January 1, 2004. The breeds must have a minimum of 150 dogs with three generation pedigrees recorded in the FSS®, a national breed club with members in at least 20 states, and an AKC approved breed standard. The Bluetick Coonhound was one of 20 breeds who met the requirements. Requests by breed clubs to have their breeds compete in the various Performance Events would be considered on a case-by-case basis.